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Archive for the ‘Ale’ tag

Saison Dupont (Vielle Provision) – Brasserie Dupont (2012)

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BLC Says
Brasserie Dupont Saison Dupont (still labeled as Vielle Provision here in the USA) is considered the standard of this refreshing Belgian farmhouse style. Saison (season in French) originally referred to refreshing ales brewed by farmers to be consumed during the summer. These beers started out around 3% abv but modern interpretations hover closer to 5-6% range. Saison Dupont is 6.5% and most current American saisons copy the yeast used by the Dupont brewery because it ferments better at warmer temperatures. Saison Dupont is popular all over the world and we have had the pleasure of tasting it in several countries including Belgium. This review is of a 2012 bottle purchased and enjoyed locally. We had our bottle of Saison Dupont on New Year’s Eve so this was the first beer enjoyed by BLC in the 2013. keep reading...

Written by A+K

January 5th, 2013 at 3:03 pm

Wet Hopped Pale Ale – Long Ireland Beer Company (2012)

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BLC Says:
Long Ireland Wet Hopped Pale Ale was produced in a very limited batch, yielding only 1500 bottles that were sold at the brewery and select distributors. This 100% brewed and bottled on Long Island beer also uses locally grown “wet”, freshly harvested, Cascade hops from Condzella’s Farm in Wading River. Having a homefield advantage of being from Long Island, we were able to obtain a bottle relatively easily. The brew itself is a golden, amber color with a foamy white head that leaves behind a substantial amount of lacing. The aroma predominately features hops (no shock there) but there are also grassy, citrus notes in play. Bready malt rounds out the scent and prepares you for the sip, which actually is not quite as diverse as the aroma would indicate. The body is a bit light and although there is a good amount of carbonation, it is not vigorous and results in a slightly creamy beer. There are hop notes present in the taste, as well as a bit of malt, but they are both on the muted side. It finishes with a hint of hoppy bitterness and citrus leaving a bittersweet aftertaste. keep reading...

Written by A+K

December 19th, 2012 at 1:27 am

Wet Hops Experiment – Blue Point Brewing Company (2012)

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BLC Says:
Blue Point had fresh hops sent over night to the brewery from the Pacific Northwest in order to produce their 2012 Blue Point Brewery Wet Hops Experiment. This brew was a very limited release and was sold on tap in either growlers or pints. We opted to take home a fresh filled growler. The beer has an amber body with orange hues and a cream colored head that stays up for awhile, leaving a bit of lacing and a thin, foamy cap when it subsides. Bright hops come through in the aroma, with fruity and floral notes in the background. The fresh, hoppy scent is backed up by a bready, slightly toasted malt presence. A hint of earthy grass ties it all together. The sip has a nice, lively amount of carbonation and bitterness throughout, managing to balance all of its parts. There is a bright quality to the flavor and while it is hoppy and floral start to finish, it ends on a malty note leaving you wanting another sip to begin the cycle again. keep reading...

Written by A+K

December 17th, 2012 at 10:30 pm

Northern Hemisphere Harvest Ale – Sierra Nevada Brewing Company (2012)

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BLC Says:
Sierra Nevada Northern Hemisphere Harvest clocks in at 6.7% ABV and is around $4-5 for a 24 ounce bottle. It has limited availability as it uses wet hops, but it was readily available at most beverage shops that carry craft beer. Since this was the first wet hopped beer commercially produced in America, it was only fitting that this was the first one we sampled (technically we sampled Southern Hemisphere first but who’s counting?). The beer pours a reddish-amber hue with a slightly off-white head. It leaves a ton of lacing that almost resembles snow on a window pane settling into a foam cap and ring which become your companion the entire time you are drinking the brew. The aroma resembles fresh cut grass with smokey, wood-like undertones. There are also bready, malty notes and a slight hint of citrus and fruit. Aspects of the aroma carry over to the taste, though the flavors are a bit milder than expected. It has a malty, bready, roasted quality and there is almost a chewy, sticky texture to the body. Hops, citrus and fruit also sparkle throughout the sip. Overall this is a well balanced beer that mixes both sweet and bitter flavors and leaves you with a hoppy, fruity aftertaste. keep reading...

Written by A+K

December 17th, 2012 at 7:20 pm

Imperial Porter – Southampton Publick House (2011)

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Southampton Imperial Porter Aged 1 one year

BLC Says:
Since we were on the topic of Southampton Publick house in both good (fall fun) and bad (canceling the 2013 Russian imperial stout release), it seemed like a good time to pop open one of their beers. In the depths of the Beer Loves Company cold storage units (which are guarded by a Black Unicorn) we happened to have an aged bottle of Southampton Imperial Porter. Imperial (Baltic) porters are perfect for this lull between fall and winter, so into our glasses it went.

This 2011 brew is a deep, opaque black with ruby hues that appear when the light hits it. There is a small tan head that quickly settles down, leaving what looks like an oil slick on top of the liquid and a tiny bit of lacing. Dark fruits (figs, raisins, dates), sweet malt and alcohol all come through in the scent, which is a bit on the strong side although it balances nicely. The sip is a bit more complex. It begins with a touch of a bitterness but before you can adjust to that, sweet dark fruits come rushing in. These flavors are then quickly whisked away with a dry finish and the bitterness from earlier returns in the aftertaste. A faint coffee taste is left in your mouth which is odd since there is not a coffee/cocoa presence throughout. It does seem like aging this for a year allowed the flavors to develop and intensify while bringing an overall lighter presence to the brew. We will buy a fresh bottle this year to compare. All in the name of science, of course. keep reading...

Written by A+K

November 29th, 2012 at 10:16 pm