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Archive for the ‘ESB’ tag

ESB (Extra Special Bitter) – Long Ireland Beer Company (2014)

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20140602-173414.jpgBLC Says:
Extra Special Bitter or ESB is a style that has it’s origins in the brewing traditions of the United Kingdom. This English pale ale, while sounding like it could be packed with hops, is actually a malt driven beer. The bitterness referred to by the moniker Extra Special Bitter actually is presented as a counter point and balance to the malt base. These brews tend to have a little more oomph in the alcohol department so they were given the “Extra” or sometimes “Strong” tag, differentiating them from Ordinary/Standard and Special/Best/Premium bitters. American interpretations of this classic English ale tend to include more hop flavor and aroma. We are glad to sample any bitter when we come across one as they are a bit of a rarity and it was a nice surprise to find another well made version brewed on Long Island. keep reading...

Written by A+K

June 6th, 2014 at 10:20 am

Driftwood Ale (craft can) – Montauk Brewing Company (2014)

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20140602-083828.jpgBLC Says: Montauk Driftwood Ale is an ESB, aka Extra Special Bitter, a style that you don’t see too often and see even less frequently in a can. Surprisingly, this is Montauk Brewing Companies Flagship Ale and they have been brewing it since their opening in 2012, though it just made it’s way into cans in March. Though Montauk beers are currently not made on site, you can visit their tasting room to sample their offerings year round. There are plans to build a brewery, so hopefully we will be reporting back with a grand opening date soon. Now, onto the beer. We had previously only tried Driftwood Ale on draft, since that was the only option, and it actually does taste a bit different in the can. It pours a light copper color with golden highlights and a thick, white head that leaves behind lots of lacing should you choose to pour it into a glass. The aroma is heavily lemon scented, with notes of both malt and hops, though neither are overpowering. There is a bit of sweetness and light fruit present, though the citrus is really front and center. Though the malt aroma is in the background, it really comes through in the taste, with lemon still being prevalent as well. Throughout the sip there is a bready, caramel sweetness and it finishes on a bitter, hoppy note. Carbonation is prevalent throughout and the medium body builds to a slick finish followed by a dry aftertaste. We plan on taking the trip out to Montauk soon (while the canned version is still fresh in our heads) to sample the draft version and contrast and compare. keep reading...

Written by A+K

June 2nd, 2014 at 7:39 am