logo


Archive for the ‘Fall’ tag

Kicking the Keg on 2012

0 comments

Have a happy and healthy wrap up to 2012 everyone. Here’s to even more beer and cheer in the New Year!

Written by A+K

December 31st, 2012 at 9:20 pm

Scythe & Sickle – Brewery Ommegang (2012)

0 comments

BLC Says:
Scythe & Sickle from Brewery Ommegang was brewed in honor of the harvest season, which is where the fall tie in comes into play. However, those expecting either a pumpkin brew or a darker beer should look elsewhere. Though this is autumn seasonal, there are Belgian elements in play (Ommegang is part of the Duvel family of beers). Ommegang adds oats, wheat, barley and rye to the grain bill of this brew bringing a, “mood of fall”. The body is a deep, hazy gold with a very fluffy white head that eventually settles to a white cap, leaving a substantial amount of lacing. Belgian yeast is front and center in the aroma, with heavy notes of spice and fruit. There is a slight hop note as well as a funky, barn like scent that nicely compliments the others. As varied as the aroma is, the flavor is even more so. Right away you taste yeast, a bit of a funky sour presence, fruit (tart apple and a hint of banana), citrus and a smack of sweetness. Despite all these rich flavors, the mouth feel is full but not overly heavy or thick. A medium carbonation is present and breaks up the flavors a bit. The finish is dry yet inviting, as there is a slightly bitter aftertaste that makes way for a hint of sweet fruit that sticks around. keep reading...

Written by A+K

November 27th, 2012 at 10:13 pm

Sierra Nevada Tumbler Autumn Brown Ale – Sierra Nevada Brewing Company (2012)

0 comments

BLC Says:
Although we tried Sierra Nevada Tumbler Autumn Brown Ale in the warmer months, this is in fact an autumn seasonal. Actually, it was among the first of the genre to hit the shelves in New York. If you are all pumpkin-ed out but still want your beer to reflect the season, this is a viable alternative. It pours a medium brown color with a rusty hue. The head is tan and it sticks around for awhile, leaving a web of lacing in its wake. It has a bright, fresh aroma with hints or roasted malt, caramel and chocolate. Very faint spiced undertones float  in the background. This brown ale is medium bodied with a smooth mouth feel that helps deliver the rich flavors. There are elements of malt and caramel throughout the sip with a hint of maple. A subtle chocolate note is present along with a distinct roasted, almost smokey quality. A slight bitterness gives way to a dry finish that balances out the flavors. We would almost call this a “late fall” beer due to it’s departure from pumpkin elements and focus on warmer, heartier flavors. keep reading...

Written by A+K

November 27th, 2012 at 9:38 pm

Posted in Beer,Seasonal

Tagged with , , , , ,

Sayonara Squash San aka Farewell to Pumpkin Beer

0 comments

Days are shorter, most trees have shed their leaves and pumpkin beers are in their twilight for the year…

Well, that was quick! Fall really is flying by. This years pumpkins have been carved, turkeys have been cooked and leftovers have been consumed. Christmas lights, trees and decorations are starting to pop up everywhere. Though it is still November, it seems fall is behind us and winter is about ready swoop in and cover us in blankets of snow. With winter comes a whole new offering of seasonal brews, but it does sadly mean that it is time to close the door on pumpkin beers (for this year, anyway). Over the past couple of weeks bars and brewpubs have been tapping their final kegs of pumpkin ale, making way for the post-Thanksgiving season of darker, rich, warming, winter and holiday focused beers. keep reading...

Thanksgiving Leftovers: The Sandwich (Plus Beer Pairing)

0 comments

Thanksgiving Leftovers

left·o·ver [left-oh-ver] adj. Remaining as an unused portion or amount. n. 1. A remnant or an unused portion. 2. leftovers Food remaining from a previous meal.

Leftovers are a huge part of the Thanksgiving tradition. For some people these delicious remnants are better than the actual Turkey-Day dinner itself. Let’s face it, the meal you slaved over is going to taste about 1 million (dollars) times better with your in-laws and relatives out of the house. Seriously, holidays are stressful so enjoy the fruits of your labor in peace. We won’t tell your aunt Edna.

This year we had several traditional items remaining and decided to combine them in a non-traditional way. We used several ingredients: stuffing, turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy and cranberry sauce to make a sandwich on bakery rye bread. This delicious monstrosity was dubbed, “the Gobble-nator”, and we try to use an ominous voice when mentioning it. Such a powerful sandwich commands both awe and respect. While we admit slapping eveything together to create a thanksgiving sandwich may not be totally rare these days, as this article from the Village Voice shows, it isn’t super common and is a great way to put extra to use. The ingredients used are limited only to what you have on hand or you think your guts can handle. So take a breath, get those leftovers out and build your own Gobble-nator! keep reading...

Written by A+K

November 26th, 2012 at 2:45 pm